As one of the nation's oldest medical schools, we are proud of our history and excited about our future.

We are the state of Georgia's only public medical school and are committed to educating physicians who will lead the state of Georgia and the world to better health by providing excellence in biomedical education, discovery, and practice.

Meeting this challenge demands the most exceptional and talented students to train to become our next generation of outstanding physicians and world-class researchers. lt also requires that our physician workforce be as diverse as the population it serves, culturally and socioeconomically.

We seek students who are committed to academic excellence and Augusta University's core values of collegiality, compassion, excellence, inclusivity, integrity, and leadership.

No matter where you are in your educational path, our office is available to answer any questions you have about the admissions process.

MCG Medicine Magazine  

 


MCG's response to pre-requisite courses affected by COVID-19

The Office of Admissions is sensitive to the academic burden placed on applicants attempting to complete graded pre-requisite courses that were converted to online and/or Pass/Fail during the COVID-19 pandemic. Towards this end, all successfully completed pre-requisite courses (including Pass/Fail and online) affected by COVID-19 (Spring, Summer and Fall semesters 2020 and Spring, Summer and Fall semesters 2021) will be accepted for credit by the Office of Admissions upon verification with that applicant’s institution. This will only apply to those courses in which the applicant was actively enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pass/Fail and online courses will not be accepted for required Biology and Chemistry coursework outside of this exception.

COVID-19 INFORMATION

 

Related Links

 


The 2021-22 Application Cycle

Applications for the Medical College of Georgia's Class of 2026 officially open through AMCAS on Thursday, May 3, 2021. Students that applied filled out a centralized medical school application through AMCAS by visiting: www.aamc.org/amcas

Please note that in addition to submitting the appropriate applications, completing the required prerequisites and taking the MCAT exam, students are also required to complete the CASPer exam, a ninety-minute online test used to assess key personal and professional characteristics. The CASPer exam is now bundled in the Altus Suite. In addition, beginning with the 2018-19 application cycle, the Medical College of Georgia moved to a Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) format. Competitive applicants who are invited to interview at MCG will experience eight mini interviews, over a ninety-minute time period. 

*Given the highly competitive nature of the applicant pool, applicants with GPAs less than 3.0, or MCAT scores less than 496, are not considered competitive for interview.


The CASPer Test - Computer-Based Assessment for Sampling Personal Characteristics 

All applicants to the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University are required to complete an online assessment (CASPer), to assist with our selection process for the 2021-2022 application cycle. Successful completion of CASPer is mandatory in order to maintain admission eligibility.

The CASPer exam is now bundled in the Altus Suite. The Altus Suite consists of 3 tests, CASPer, Snapshot and Duet, however CASPer is the only test required for MCG's admissions process. CASPer is an online test which assesses for non-cognitive skills and interpersonal characteristics that we believe are important for successful students and graduates of our program, and will complement the other tools that we use for applicant screening. In implementing CASPer, we are trying to further enhance fairness and objectivity in our selection process. 

In order to take the Altus Suite, you will be responsible for securing access to a laptop or desktop computer with webcam and audio capabilities. You will require the following for both account creation and taking the test:

  • Government-issued photo ID
  • Valid email address
  • Working webcam
  • Working microphone
  • Reliable high-speed internet connection

Please go to www.takeAltus.com to sign up for the Medicine test (CSP-10111 - U.S. Medicine), under your specific country (USA), and reserve a test using your AMCAS ID and a piece of government-issued photo ID. You will be provided with a limited number of testing dates and times based on the admissions timeline and requirements. Please note that these are the only testing dates available for your CASPer test, and you must select Augusta University for distribution before the posted Distribution Deadline. Likely, there will be no additional tests scheduled, but the most up to date information can be found by browsing the Test Dates and Times on takeAltus.com. Please use an email address that you check regularly; there may be updates to the test schedule.

To account for identity verification and payment processing timeline, ensure that you register for your test at least 3 days before your preferred test date and time. Last-minute bookings are not recommended. If you require testing accommodations for CASPer, you will need to submit the Accommodations Request Form signed by you and your qualified professional 3 weeks in advance of your desired test date. More information regarding CASPer accommodations can be found here.

Please direct any inquiries on the test to support@takecasper.com. Alternatively, you may use the chat bubble in the bottom right hand corner of your screen on the takeAltus.com website.

The Altus Suite consists of 3 tests, CASPer, Snapshot and Duet. The suite typically takes between 75-120 minutes to complete. Casper takes about 60-90 minutes to complete, while Snapshot and Duet each take about 10-15 minutes. The CASPer test is comprised of 12 sections of video and written scenarios. Following each scenario, you will be required to answer a set of probing questions under a time contract. Each response is graded by a different rater, giving a very robust and reliable view of personal and professional characteristics important to our program. No studying is required for CASPer, although you may want to familiarize yourself with the test structure at takealtus.com, and ensure you have a quiet environment to take the test. We strongly urge you to take advantage of the 12-section practice test, which will not only immerse you in the test environment, but will also ensure you meet the technical requirements to access and complete the test. 

CASPer test results are valid for one admissions cycle. Applicants who have already taken the test in previous years will therefore be expected to re-take it.

For a more detailed look at the CASPer test, please see this video.

Last Test Date for 2021-22 Early Decision: June 29, 2021

Score Distribution Deadline for 2021-22 Early Decision: July 12, 2021

Last Test Date for 2021-22 Regular Decision: September 23, 2021

Score Distribution Deadline for 2021-22 Regular Decision: October 6, 2021

For questions regarding admission, please call 706-721-3186 or email mcgadmissions@augusta.edu 


For 2021-2022 Accepted Applicants

MCG Acceptance & Withdrawal Procedures

All accepted applicants to the Medical College of Georgia will need to indicate their interest in accepting their admission through the "Choose Your Medical School Tool" in AMCAS. A full list of dates/deadlines can be found in the MCG Acceptance & Withdrawal Procedures.


Inspiring Students

photo of Chandler Johnson

Chandler Johnson

  • Hometown: Rome, GA
  • Campus: Athens
  • Year: Current M2

"Having the support of my classmates and the faculty at my campus has made my medical school experience so enjoyable."

Fast Facts:

  • Graduated from University Of Georgia
  • Majored in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Peace Corp Prep certified

Tell us a little about yourself.

  • I am a current M2 at the AU/UGA Medical Partnership Campus in Athens. I went to the University of Georgia for undergrad, where I majored in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Spanish, and received a certificate in Peace Corps Prep. Before my time in Athens began, I lived in Rome, Georgia where I attended Darlington School. My father is a retired physician, and my mother is a retired nurse—it is safe to say that they inspired me to pursue a career in medicine. 

What is a typical day like for you?

  • A typical day for me involves waking up at around 6:15, when I make coffee and begin to review the day’s material. If it is a day when we have Small Group Learning (SGL); I can expect a lecture or two beforehand. Then, I spend two hours with my group of seven other students and two faculty facilitators covering two cases relevant to the week’s material. After SGL, I either prepare for a visit to my Community and Population Health site, drive over to St. Mary’s Hospital for a clinical skills session, or do independent study. One thing in my day that I never miss is another cup of coffee—usually from Sip’s café, where they know me by name. I will usually wrap up my day with a workout at Ramsey Student Center while I listen to a podcast, have dinner, then get a good night’s rest for the next day.

What is something people may be surprised to know about you?

  • I have visited over 400 National Park sites in every state and US territory, and was recognized by the Department of the Interior and given a ranger hat!

What do you consider your greatest accomplishment to be?

  • Becoming a medical student is my greatest accomplishment thus far; being here feels like a blessing, and I do not take the opportunity lightly. I understand that I am in a position to learn as much as I can to prepare myself to take care of my future patients!

What advice do you have for students just starting their journey in Medicine?

  • My advice to students beginning their journey is to never underestimate yourself, and never lose sight of your goals. Hard work, determination, and enthusiasm will help you accomplish your goals. Lean on your support network, seek out guidance and advice from people you trust, and you will succeed!

What motivated you to want to be a physician?

  • Growing up with parents who worked in the medical profession motivated me to want to become a physician. I could see how gratifying it was for them to form relationships with their patients. So many times, when we were out in my hometown, former patients would thank them for the excellent care they provided. Being a physician will allow me to be a part of a profession where I can dedicate my life to serving others.

What do you hope to do after completing medical school?

  • After completing medical school, I plan to attend residency in my chosen specialty. I am undecided on the specialty I will pursue as of right now: I look forward to exploring my options!

Who are your role models?

  • My parents are my role models. They have been my rock through my academic journey and a sounding board for my dreams.

Why did you choose the Medical College of Georgia's AU/UGA Medical Partnership Campus? 

  • While an undergraduate at UGA, I spent quite a bit of time studying on the Health Sciences campus, especially in Carnegie Library, because many of my friends were medical students here! I not only enjoyed the facilities on campus, but also the collaborative energy that I could sense even though I was not a student here at the time. After learning more about the curriculum at this campus, and the emphasis on community service, I knew that this campus fit my values.

What has been your favorite or most powerful experience in medical school?

  • I never imagined I would begin medical school in the midst of a global pandemic. It has been extremely gratifying to be trained in administering vaccines, then helping with the COVID-19 vaccination effort in our community. Through my Community and Population Health course, which I do at The Potter’s House residential recovery program, I have formed strong patient-provider relationships with many of the patients who receive primary care there. I was able to vaccinate one patient who already knew me very well. We had a great exchange, and it was a special feeling knowing I helped him him feel more comfortable about taking the vaccine.

What has surprised you the most, or what would you like people to know about MCG?

  • I was surprised by the extent of the close-knit, collaborative atmosphere between not only the students, but between students and faculty! The small group learning at the AU/UGA Medical Partnership campus fosters great professional relationships with faculty mentors. I always feel extremely supported if I ever have a question or concern. Having the support of my classmates and the faculty at my campus has made my medical school experience enjoyable.

What is your favorite thing to do at your campus?

  • My favorite thing to do on campus when it’s warm outside is find a shady spot to hang my hammock, or roll out a mat, to sit and study. Otherwise, you can find me studying and hanging out in the “bone room,” otherwise known as the Anatomage room…or my lair. When I am not studying, I love shopping in local boutiques, catching a show at GA Theatre, or eating at one of the many restaurants downtown.

photo of Michael Butler

Michael Butler

  • Hometown: Grayson, GA
  • Campus: Augusta
  • Year: Current M2

"...Remember to enjoy your journey."

Fast Facts:

  • Graduated from the University of Georgia
  • MCG 3+ GA PGY-1 Pathway Candidate
  • Minored in Spanish

Please tell us a little about yourself.

  • Before coming to the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, I attended the University of Georgia as a Chemistry major. While at UGA, I spent about a year conducting research in a lab that studied the apoptotic effects of salt solutions on cancer cells. Furthermore, I worked as a teaching assistant for the General Chemistry Department at UGA. Even though I enjoyed Chemistry, I found that it was not as fulfilling as I had anticipated. As a result, I decided to explore other areas and careers. During this time of indecision, I worked for the Customer Service Department at Publix Supermarkets and found that I had an interest in helping others. After spending some time shadowing and volunteering in the medical setting, I decided that a career in medicine would allow me to use my love of science to improve the lives of those around me. After committing to a career in medicine, I decided that the field of Family Medicine fits my interests the most. Specifically, I am interested in Family Medicine because of the broad range of patients, conditions, and diseases I will work with as well as the ability to practice continuity of care with my patients. Ultimately, my goal is to practice Family Medicine in an underserved area of Georgia.

            Beyond the classroom, I enjoy spending time with my friends and family. Some of the activities I have done recently with my friends include playing the board game Codenames, getting dinner at Vallarta Mexican Restaurant, and getting ice cream at Pink Dipper. Some of the activities I enjoy doing with my family include fishing with my dad, shopping with my mom, and playing with my dog, Maverick. A fun fact about myself is that I minored in Spanish at UGA. Although I am not completely fluent in Spanish, I find that I can understand it well and can communicate at an advanced level. I really enjoy Spanish culture, and I hope that one day I will have the opportunity to visit a Spanish-speaking country like Spain or Costa Rica.

What is a typical day like for you?

  • As you would expect, my typical day as a medical student is quite busy. I begin my day by attending the 8:00am lectures in the J. Harold Harrison Education Commons. Usually, there are three one-hour lectures covering topics related to normal physiology, disease pathology, or disease treatment. From 11:00am to 1:00pm, I have a lunch break. Normally, I use this time to eat lunch, attend meetings, and study. At 1:00pm, I begin my afternoon activities. Depending on the day of the week, I may have case-based learning (CBL) from 3:00pm to 5:00pm, patient centered learning (PCL) from 1:00pm to 5:00pm, or ultrasound clinic from 1:00pm to 5:00pm. While these activities may sound overwhelming, they are much more enjoyable than the lectures because of their hands-on nature. With faculty guidance, my group and I work through real patient cases (CBL), practice our clinical skills in a comfortable setting (PCL), or learn to use real medical equipment (Ultrasound clinic). After 5:00pm, I am free to use my evening however I choose. During the evening, I may spend my time studying the day’s lectures, volunteering at a student-led clinic, or relaxing by getting dinner with a friend. Even though my day is busy, I can make time to get my work done, eat a great meal, and do the things I love.

What is something people may be surprised to know about you?

  • I think the most surprising thing about me is that I minored in Spanish at the University of Georgia. Because of my years of practicing, I can speak Spanish at an advanced level. Additionally, I have a great interest in Hispanic culture. After years of studying various Spanish-speaking countries, I have come to really enjoy the subject. I hope that one day I may visit a Spanish-speaking country like Spain or Costa Rica.

What do you consider your greatest accomplishment to be?

  • My greatest accomplishment was done here at the Medical College of Georgia. During my first year, I was accepted to the inaugural class of the MCG 3+ Georgia PGY-1 Pathway. This exciting, new program allows the state of Georgia to train more primary care physicians in less time to care for patients in rural and underserved areas of Georgia. By participating in this program, I have accepted a scholarship that will cover my tuition and fees for two years in exchange for my commitment to work in a rural or underserved area of Georgia for two years. Additionally, this program will allow me to graduate from MCG with my MD degree in three years. After which, I will attend a residency program in a primary care field here at MCG. I believe this program is an outstanding initiative by the state of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia that will have dramatic effects on the health of Georgians. I am excited to lead this program as part of the inaugural class and complete my journey with an outstanding group of students by my side.

What advice do you have for students just starting their journey in Medicine?

  • To the future students at the Medical College of Georgia, I would like to advise you to remember to enjoy your journey. The pathway you are undertaking is long and difficult, but you will not be alone. You will be surrounded by family and friends who love you and are always supporting you throughout your career. At times, you may feel overwhelmed, exhausted, and defeated, so it is important that you remember to spend time with your family and friends. Even when times are tough, they will be there to pick you back up and remind you of why you are becoming a physician.

What motivated you to want to be a physician?

  • To the future students at the Medical College of Georgia, I would like to advise you to remember to enjoy your journey. The pathway you are undertaking is long and difficult, but you will not be alone. You will be surrounded by family and friends who love you and are always supporting you throughout your career. At times, you may feel overwhelmed, exhausted, and defeated, so it is important that you remember to spend time with your family and friends. Even when times are tough, they will be there to pick you back up and remind you of why you are becoming a physician.

What do you hope to do after completing medical school?

  • After I complete medical school, I intent to spend my medical career serving the state of Georgia as a Family Medicine physician. I hope to one day return to academic medicine towards the end of my career and train the future doctors of the world.

Who are your role models?

  • The greatest role model in my life is my grandfather. The son of a general practitioner in Cuba, my grandfather made it his goal to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a physician. Unfortunately, his dream would be postponed for some time as the Castro regime swept across Cuba. After graduating from the University of Havana, he fled his homeland with his wife and infant son, seeking refuge in the United States. From there, he fulfilled is dreams by obtaining an American medical license and practicing Urology in Warner Robins, Georgia. He passed away in 2011, but his legacy inspires me to work hard to achieve my goals and serve my community as a physician.

Why did you choose the Medical College of Georgia' at Augusta University?

  • As a Georgia native, I was confident that I wanted to complete my medical training in my home state. That meant I had to choose between four excellent programs that would all provide me with an excellent education and the skills to treat patients. However, the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University stood apart from the others as the state of Georgia’s only public medical school. This designation assures me that MCG’s commitment to serving Georgia is genuine, an aspect that is very important to me. Their commitment to biomedical education, discovery, patient care, and service allow their students to lead Georgia as aspiring young physicians. When I visited MCG for my interview and tour, I had no doubt that this was the medical school I wanted to attend.

What has been your favorite or most powerful experience in medical school?

  • The most powerful experience of my medical school career was the night I volunteered with the student-led Equality Clinic. For my part, I was asked to visit patients of the LGBTQ+ community, take a history, and report my findings to a physician. When I spoke to these patients, I was shocked at the challenges they face. Many of the patients I saw lacked insurance or funds to obtain basic healthcare. For many, the Equality Clinic is the only way they can obtain prescription medications and life-saving advice from trained physicians. Another disheartening detail of these patients’ lives was that many of them lack support from their families and peers. The bravery and strength of these patients is palpable, and I owe it to the Equality Clinic for allowing me to meet such inspiring people.

What has surprised you the most, or what would you like people to know about MCG?

  • The most surprising aspect of MCG is how close my class is to one another. As one of the nation’s largest medical schools by class size, I expected to become lost in the crowd. Instead, my peers and I feel a special bond that connects us and allows medical school to be much less stressful. Almost every weekend, I spend time with my friends relaxing, volunteering, or studying. I appreciate the opportunity to attend MCG and become a part of this big family. At the Medical College of Georgia, it is easy to fit in and feel at home.

What is your favorite thing to do at your campus?

  • At the Augusta campus, my favorite thing to do is to learn new clinical techniques in the simulation center. On the third floor of the J. Harold Harrison building, we can use the latest technological advances in medical training to build our skills in preparation for seeing patients during our clinical rotations. I have had the chance to interact with standardized patients, practice splinting/casting, and perform knee arthrocentesis on mannequins. I think the most amazing thing about the simulation center is the incredibly life-like mannequins. In fact, they are so advanced that they can blink, talk, and produce heart sounds, lung sounds, and pulses. I am always very exciting when we get to run an emergency medicine simulation!

    With regards to the city of Augusta, my favorite thing to do is to travel just over the Georgia-South Carolina border and watch a baseball game at SRP Park. In this lively area of North Augusta, you can eat great food and enjoy watching the Augusta Green Jackets, an Atlanta Braves affiliate, alongside the Savannah River. Afterwards, you can stop at Pink Dipper on your way home to enjoy a delicious ice cream cone.

 

Contact Us

Medical College of Georgia office of Admissions

Health Sciences Campus

G. Lombard Kelly Building

706-721-3186

MCG Admissions

1459 Laney Walker, AA 2040, Augusta, GA 30912

706-721-0959

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