As one of the nation's oldest medical schools, the Medical College of Georgia is proud of our history and excited about our future.

We are the state of Georgia's only public medical school and are committed to educating physicians who will lead the state of Georgia and the world to better health by providing excellence in biomedical education, discovery, and practice.

Meeting this challenge demands the most exceptional and talented students to train to become our next generation of outstanding physicians and world-class researchers. lt also requires that our physician workforce be as diverse as the population it serves, culturally and socioeconomically.

We seek students who are committed to academic excellence and Augusta University's core values of collegiality, compassion, excellence, inclusivity, integrity, and leadership.

No matter where you are in your educational path, our office is available to answer any questions you have about the admissions process.

MCG Medicine Magazine  

 


MCG's response to prerequisite courses affected by COVID-19

The Office of Admissions is sensitive to the academic burden placed on applicants attempting to complete graded prerequisite courses that were converted to online and/or Pass/Fail during the COVID-19 pandemic. Towards this end, all successfully completed prerequisite courses (including Pass/Fail and online) affected by COVID-19 (Spring, Summer and Fall semesters 2020 and Spring, Summer and Fall semesters 2021, and Spring 2022) will be accepted for credit by the Office of Admissions upon verification with that applicant’s institution. This will only apply to those courses in which the applicant was actively enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pass/Fail and online courses will not be accepted for required Biology and Chemistry coursework outside of this exception.

COVID-19 INFORMATION

 

Related Links

 


The 2022-23 Application Cycle

Applications for the Medical College of Georgia's Class of 2027 officially open through AMCAS on Tuesday, May 3, 2022. Students that applied filled out a centralized medical school application through AMCAS by visiting: www.aamc.org/amcas

Please note that in addition to submitting the appropriate applications, completing the required prerequisites and taking the MCAT exam, students are also required to complete the CASPer exam, a ninety-minute online test used to assess key personal and professional characteristics. The CASPer exam is now bundled in the Altus Suite. In addition, beginning with the 2018-19 application cycle, the Medical College of Georgia moved to a Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) format. Competitive applicants who are invited to interview at MCG will experience eight mini interviews, over a ninety-minute time period. 

*Given the highly competitive nature of the applicant pool, applicants with GPAs less than 3.0, or MCAT scores less than 496, are not considered competitive for interview.


The CASPer Test - Computer-Based Assessment for Sampling Personal Characteristics 

All applicants to the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University are required to complete an online assessment (CASPer), to assist with our selection process for the 2022-2023 application cycle. Successful completion of CASPer is mandatory in order to maintain admission eligibility.

The CASPer exam is now bundled in the Altus Suite. The Altus Suite consists of 3 tests, CASPer, Snapshot and Duet, however CASPer is the only test required for MCG's admissions process. CASPer is an online test which assesses for non-cognitive skills and interpersonal characteristics that we believe are important for successful students and graduates of our program, and will complement the other tools that we use for applicant screening. In implementing CASPer, we are trying to further enhance fairness and objectivity in our selection process. 

In order to take the Altus Suite, you will be responsible for securing access to a laptop or desktop computer with webcam and audio capabilities. You will require the following for both account creation and taking the test:

  • Government-issued photo ID
  • Valid email address
  • Working webcam
  • Working microphone
  • Reliable high-speed internet connection

Please go to www.takeAltus.com to sign up for the Medicine test (CSP-10111 - U.S. Medicine), under your specific country (USA), and reserve a test using your AMCAS ID and a piece of government-issued photo ID. You will be provided with a limited number of testing dates and times based on the admissions timeline and requirements. Please note that these are the only testing dates available for your CASPer test, and you must select Augusta University for distribution before the posted Distribution Deadline. Likely, there will be no additional tests scheduled, but the most up to date information can be found by browsing the Test Dates and Times on takeAltus.com. Please use an email address that you check regularly; there may be updates to the test schedule.

To account for identity verification and payment processing timeline, ensure that you register for your test at least 3 days before your preferred test date and time. Last-minute bookings are not recommended. If you require testing accommodations for CASPer, you will need to submit the Accommodations Request Form signed by you and your qualified professional 3 weeks in advance of your desired test date. More information regarding CASPer accommodations can be found here.

Please direct any inquiries on the test to support@takecasper.com. Alternatively, you may use the chat bubble in the bottom right hand corner of your screen on the takeAltus.com website.

The Altus Suite consists of 3 tests, CASPer, Snapshot and Duet. The suite typically takes between 75-120 minutes to complete. Casper takes about 60-90 minutes to complete, while Snapshot and Duet each take about 10-15 minutes. The CASPer test is comprised of 12 sections of video and written scenarios. Following each scenario, you will be required to answer a set of probing questions under a time contract. Each response is graded by a different rater, giving a very robust and reliable view of personal and professional characteristics important to our program. No studying is required for CASPer, although you may want to familiarize yourself with the test structure at takealtus.com, and ensure you have a quiet environment to take the test. We strongly urge you to take advantage of the 12-section practice test, which will not only immerse you in the test environment, but will also ensure you meet the technical requirements to access and complete the test. 

CASPer test results are valid for one admissions cycle. Applicants who have already taken the test in previous years will therefore be expected to re-take it.

For a more detailed look at the CASPer test, please see this video.

Last Test Date for 2022-23 Early Decision: June 28, 2022

Last Test Date for 2022-23 Regular Decision: September 29, 2022

Final Score Distribution Deadline for 2022-23 Regular Decision: October 13, 2022

For questions regarding admission, please call 706-721-3186 or email mcgadmissions@augusta.edu 


For 2021-2022 Accepted Applicants

MCG Acceptance & Withdrawal Procedures

All accepted applicants to the Medical College of Georgia will need to indicate their interest in accepting their admission through the "Choose Your Medical School Tool" in AMCAS. A full list of dates/deadlines can be found in the MCG Acceptance & Withdrawal Procedures.


Inspiring Students

photo of Peter Garcia IV

Peter Garcia IV

  • Hometown: Savannah, GA
  • Campus: Augusta
  • Year: Current M2

"Even if you have an idea of what specialty you want to choose, be open-minded and prepared to explore all the different fields of medicine."

Fast Facts:

  • I graduated from Mercer University with a BS in Biology and BA in Spanish
  • I studied graphic design, video production, and photography all throughout high school at a visual and performing arts school.
  • I graduate summa cum laude and with university honors

Tell us a little about yourself.

  • I am from Savannah, GA, but I was born in El Paso, Tx. I am of Hispanic heritage. I went to Mercer University where I earned a BS in Biology and BA in Spanish. I have practiced photography and graphic design all throughout high school and college. I’ve worked for student-run magazines and newspapers.

What is a typical day like for you?

  • I try to get an early start to the day and work out before classes. I try to watch lectures live. After lecture, I prepare for CBL or PCL depending on the day. After I am done with classes for the day I like to review lectures and also look at content from outside resources like sketchy and pathoma. Throughout the day I like to take breaks from school either exercising or watching some tv.

 What is something people may be surprised to know about you?

  • I studied graphic design, video production, and photography all throughout high school at a visual and performing arts school. I have been able to keep up with most of my skills through various clubs and jobs that I held in undergrad.

What do you consider your greatest accomplishment to be?

  • I am very proud of participating in my university’s honors college and being able to graduate summa cum laude and with university honors. I parcipated in the international scholars track of my honors program.

What advice do you have for students just starting their journey in Medicine?

  • Even if you have an idea of what specialty you want to choose, be open-minded and prepared to explore all the different fields of medicine. Your first year is a great time to network with other med students and professors. Try to shadow a wide range of specialties or at least areas you are interested in. It is a great way to get early exposure to different areas of medicine and get you connected with mentors and other peers.

What motivated you to want to be a physician?

  • As a Spanish major in undergrad, I had the opportunity to take medical Spanish classes, which helped solidify my dreams of becoming a physician. I was able to apply the medical Spanish and interpreting skills I had learned to help real patients. Although I was only an interpreter, I enjoyed observing doctors caring for their patients and making the effort to overcome language barriers. My interpreting experiences motivated me to pursue medicine so that I can help patients, especially those that are underserved.

What do you hope to do after completing medical school?

  • I ideally would like to go into surgery, but I have not narrowed down exactly which field of surgery. I am still trying to shadow as many different specialties as possible to get a well-rounded view.

 Who are your role models?

  • My favorite role models include people like Cesar Chavez, Sonia Sotomayor, and Dolores Huerta. Some of my favorite role models are people that fight for the rights of underprivileged and underserved communities.

Why did you choose the Medical College of Georgia' at Augusta University?

  • Growing up in Augusta with parents in the medical field, I have had the unique opportunity to be deeply exposed to the medical community. I love the city and the people who make it up, so I have never second guessed my decision to study medicine at this institution.

What has been your favorite or most powerful experience in medical school?

  • I have enjoyed working with patients through the student-run Clinica Latina. I have realized how I can personally help bring change to underserved communities through volunteering and learning about specific barriers to their healthcare.

What has surprised you the most, or what would you like people to know about MCG?

  • I was surprised at how well our curriculum integrates our learning with clinical skills that will help us in clerkship. Our preceptors in CBL and PCL have been providing us with first-hand lessons and anecdotes that help us contextualize lecture content in a clearer way. I have enjoyed how much our professors enjoy teaching and are always open to meeting with students and ensuring that we grasp all the material we need to learn. I also enjoy all the hands-on learning we do in PCL. This also applies to the student-run clinics that give us exposure to real-world patients.

What is your favorite thing to do at your campus?

  • On campus I really enjoy spending time with friends in the academic houses or playing soccer or basketball at the wellness center. Outside of school, I like trying new restaurants with my friends or just spending time together.

photo of Amelia Tomei

Amelia Tomei

  • Hometown: Dublin, OH
  • Campus: Athens
  • Year: Current M2

"...the most important things medical students should prioritize their own mental and physical well-being." 

Fast Facts:

  • I graduated from Swarthmore College in 2019 with a BA in Psychology.
  •  I was the first [person] in my family to pursue medicine and did not know anyone personally who could give me advice...
  • I love helping people.

Please tell us a little about yourself.

  • Before coming to Athens, I had the chance to experience living in many different parts of the U.S., including metropolitan Chicago, New York, and Columbus, Ohio. In addition, I would frequently visit family in Paraguay. I graduated from Dublin Jerome High School in Ohio in 2015 and from Swarthmore College in 2019 with a BA in Psychology. After graduating from college, I spent a year working for community behavioral health organizations in Philadelphia. Both my academic interests and work experience shaped my current interest in psychiatry and internal medicine. In my free time I enjoy painting, crochet, knitting, and cross stitch.

What is a typical day like for you?

  • Right now, a typical day for me consists of going to class in the morning, having lunch on campus, and coming home to study by myself or with my friends in the afternoon and evenings. I’m spending more time now studying to prepare for Step 1 exams, which I plan to take in June. I set aside time for breaks such as by going to the gym or working on my latest art project. I also may treat myself to a little nap in the afternoon with my cat Stewie.

What is something people may be surprised to know about you?

  • Even though I am fairly new to Georgia, I have a long family history with Athens, GA. My grandfather was an officer in the Navy and studied at the Navy Supply Corps School in the 1950s, where the Medical Partnership campus is currently located. He met my grandmother, a senior in UGA’s journalism school at the time, and they married in Athens one day after her graduation. My grandmother grew up in Athens and was part of a long family line of UGA graduates dating back to prior to the Civil War.

What do you consider your greatest accomplishment to be?

  • It has to be getting into medical school. It was difficult because of all of the pre-requisite courses, testing, and other requirements. Also, I was the first one in my family to pursue medicine and did not know anyone personally who could give me advice about applying, interviews, or guidance on what to expect or prepare for going in to school. Therefore, the fact that I was actually able to get into medical school (and at my top choice school at that!) is and will probably remain one of my greatest accomplishments.

What advice do you have for students just starting their journey in Medicine?

  • One of the most important things medical students should prioritize their own mental and physical well-being. Ironically, it can be easy to forget about our own health as we learn and care about everyone else’s. Therefore, it is important to make time in your schedule for activities that will keep you in good shape, both emotionally and physiologically.

What motivated you to want to be a physician?

  • The short answer: I love helping people. The longer answer: I wanted a way to apply my love of problem solving, creativity, learning and discovery to help others in a healthcare setting. I believe that being a physician means more than caring for an individual patient, but to serve a community as well. I wanted to become a physician, leader in the healthcare field, to make a positive impact in the health, well-being, and quality of life of others; through direct patient care, teaching, and advocacy.

What do you hope to do after completing medical school?

  • I hope to enroll in a combined Internal Medicine/Psychiatry Residency program in a major city such as Chicago, Philadelphia, or New York City. I want to continue working with urban underserved communities and advocate for them however I can.

Who are your role models?

  • My parents have been my role models all my life. One of the main ways they’ve inspired me is through their work ethic. My parents have set an example of how hard work is the most important factor in reaching one’s goals. They have also shown and taught me how setbacks aren’t really setbacks, but lessons to help one improve and learn from. Now, I have many professional role models. The amazing faculty at the Partnership, especially those I have had closer relationships with (i.e., clinical skills, SGL, CPH), have shown me how to be an effective physician and leader in the healthcare field.

Why did you choose the Medical College of Georgia's AU/UGA Medical Partnership Campus?

  • I chose this campus for a few reasons. One, it was close to my parents. I had been living far away from them for five years and wanted to live close to them during medical school. I knew that I would need their support as I ventured on my journey into medical school. Two, I loved Athens and what the community had to offer – from a beautiful UGA campus and town, new restaurants to try, shows to see, and new people to meet, it was everything I wanted. Last, but not least, I loved the small, close-knit feel of the campus. Everyone knew each other and even before starting classes I knew that I could make close friends with my classmates and always have someone to study with. I liked that the school’s culture was focused on students collaborating with one another of competing against each other. It felt very collaborative, like everyone was trying to help each other reach their goals of finishing medical school and getting into residency. 

What has been your favorite or most powerful experience in medical school?

  • My favorite and most powerful experience in medical school has to be the volunteer work I do with COSIG. One of my goals has been to help other young students on their path to medical school. I have the opportunity to do this with COSIG and our partnership with the Athens Community Career Academy. A few times a semester, I and other medical students go and see the high school students who are in the Allied Health and Medicine pathway at the Career Academy. This experience has been so meaningful to me because I can share my own experiences and encourage others to pursue a career in medicine and possibly, a career as a physician. It also gives me the opportunity to work on my own leadership skills so that I can not only be a more effective physician, but an influential part of my community.

What has surprised you the most, or what would you like people to know about MCG?

  • Something that has surprised me, especially as I work with the greater Athens community, is that not many people have actually heard of the Medical Partnership. I would like others to know, especially those in Athens, that MCG is interested in and committed to becoming a vital/integral part of the Athens community in more than just the healthcare setting.

What is your favorite thing to do at your campus?

  • My favorite thing to do in Athens is try new restaurants. There is so much good food here and there is always something new to try.

 

Contact Us

Medical College of Georgia Office of Admissions

Health Sciences Campus

Auditoria Center

706-721-3186

MCG Admissions

Hospital Access Road, BC 1100, Augusta, GA 30912

706-721-0959

facebook-square icon          instagram icon         twitter icon