Thesis Information


The honors thesis is a project of research, scholarship, or creative activity completed by an honors student under the mentorship of a thesis adviser, a faculty member of the student's choice whose area of expertise relates directly to the subject matter of the thesis. Upon its completion and approval, a student's honors thesis is published in Augusta University's scholarly commons library repository http://augusta.openrepository.com/augusta/handle/10675.2/560340  The honors program will also pay for the binding of two copies, one given to the student and one housed in the Quad Wall Building.

Resources for Students in Thesis

Honors Prospectus and Thesis Packet (please click here)

The Honors Prospectus and Thesis Packet (please click the heading above), is to be used by thesis writers and their panels. This handbook, includes specific guidelines, timelines, and forms necessary for the student to complete the thesis and for faculty to assess its quality.

Application for Honors Program Graduation (please click here)

The graduation application must be submitted to the Augusta University Registrar as well as to the Director of the Honors Program by midterm of the term preceding your final semester of coursework. Remember to keep a copy for your personal records.

FAQs - The Honors Thesis

Q: When may I begin working on my Thesis?
A: Students may begin working on their Thesis only after they have completed Thesis Prospectus. However, students may begin Thesis Prospectus no later than two full terms before their anticipated date of graduation. As such, work on Thesis Prospectus usually begins in the second semester of a student's junior year. Work on their Thesis typically takes place in the first semester of their senior year, and, if needed, may continue through the second semester of their senior year.

Q: Can I take Prospectus in the summer of my Junior Year?
A: While students are encouraged to begin informal research in the summer of their junior year, Thesis Prospectus may not be taken during the summer, due to the abbreviated time period and the decreaded accessibility of faculty advisers.